Epilepsy is the most common serious neurological condition, affecting around 600,000 people in the UK, of all ages and from all walks of life.

There are around 1,000 deaths per year in England from epilepsy, and approximately 400 deaths per year that are probably preventable.1

For the individual, living with epilepsy is life-changing. Managing the condition can be particularly difficult as it has myriad causes. Seizures can be highly variable and unpredictable, causing a loss of awareness and control, which can mean routine daily activities, such as driving, bathing and cooking can present a major risk to sufferers. Isolation and depression are common additional problems associated with epilepsy.

All of this inevitably has an impact on care providers and the NHSEpilepsy accounts for 2-3% of Emergency Department attendances, 1.3m bed days a year and costs £2bn a year to treat.2 Successful diagnosis and treatment, which is primarily individualised medication, is extremely challenging and depends on the availability of accurate, complete patient information, a continuum of care across care settings, with specialist interventions when necessary.

[1] Memorandum by the Joint Epilepsy Council (JEC) (COM 104) (2009)

[2] NICE guidelines [CG137] – Epilepsies: diagnosis and management (2012)

 

Successful diagnosis and treatment, which is primarily individualised medication, is extremely challenging and depends on the availability of accurate, complete patient information, a continuum of care across care settings, with specialist interventions when necessary.